The leopard up against it like never before…

The three posts I put at Facebook (see below) today sum up the situation. This has become a battle like never before. More on #AntiSnare towards the end of the month and we’ve had to delay finishing ‘The Importance of Leopards’ platform a little, there’s just so much going on. In the meantime if you can help please contact projects@wildtiger.org

Appended 16 July 2020:

Appended 17 July 2020:


WILDLIFE KIDS LEARNING… Wildlife protection is a mixed bag. This morning after I returned from the jungle I got the news another leopard had been shot dead in Uttarakhand, the second alleged man-eater in the last few days. It’s so hot and humid at the moment I didn’t want to sit at my laptop and make the call to get the details. It could wait and instead I did something today which was planned for tomorrow, better to be a day ahead ya? I took the wildlife kids lessons to Ridam, she will be Big Boss and distribute them to about 30 kids, it was really good that we can finally do this. It may be a while before classes start as such but these lessons prepared by Ashish and crew are a great filler. Su Se La and Anjel will hopefully be able to distribute to their village tomorrow but for me, in the little Tharu village, it was good to see kids so enthusiastic about learning again. On my way back I got a couple of hello sir and namaste Jack Tharu from kids yelling from their houses. It was good. The spirit of the jungle…


THE WAYS HUMANS KILL LEOPARDS… So this is the leopard I referred to above, the second alleged man-eater shot in that area in the last few days. At the moment in India and Nepal there are legal shoot to kill orders on certain leopards. These shootings add to the other ways humans are killing leopards across its range … they are retaliation kills (including beating to death and poisoning), trophy hunting (including being chased by baying dog packs) and poaching (which includes poisoning and snare traps). That’s not even taking into account habitat destruction. Today after talking to little Ridam about the power of the leopard (she loves leopards), I walked away thinking about the conversation I will have to have with her about what our generations are doing to the leopard. It’s a necessary conversation because Ridam’s generation will have to show a lot more concern than ours if the leopard is to survive…