Big Cats, Wildlife, Monitoring, Learning, Coexistence, Survival…

Today I was due to tell more about a leopard called ‘The Boss’ but there’s so much going on right now I’m going to delay until early next month. The Boss has a compelling story though, he survives a difficult life with tigers and humans around him and he is ‘good friend’ to different female leopards in the area including a rewilded cat a huge amount of effort went into. Those stories to come but for now just a quick post as we deal with electricity issues in the run up to an early election here, a poll which many doubt will actually happen. We live in a world of uncertainty.

Tigers and leopards are incredibly important animals so monitoring them is a vital component in their protection. The camera models in the image are just a few I’ve tested over the years. Lenses, sensors, light systems, battery systems and durability differ and I’ve been working for some time to understand and help develop what is best for certain situations. One has to understand what the prime objective is, it could be identification, activity, pre-capture, early warning, just some examples in within the spheres of human-wildlife conflict mitigation, anti-poaching and research. It takes time to get it right and nothing is foolproof when it comes to dealing with nature. Thousands and thousands of hours have taught me that.

Add technology to tracking along with sign and sampling it then becomes possible to build understanding of certain situations. It takes dedication and learning.

Transferring that learning to the next generations is more vital than ever. It’s not just about living safely with the animals living around us, it is about helping those generations understand that ecosystems, particularly protected areas, are what enables them to breathe, eat and drink clean water. Kids seem to understand this very quickly.

It concerns me that more people in more recent generations don’t truly understand this. We are never to old to be educated. In the meantime, protected areas must be valued and ‘protected’ more intensely than ever. They are not here for our entertainment, we need them, as do tigers, leopards and other wildlife, to survive…